Kolonisatie van Mars noodzaak!

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xplosive
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Lid geworden op: do jun 30, 2011 11:18 pm

Re: Kolonisatie van Mars noodzaak!

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Is dit een list van Turkije om kennis te verkrijgen van technologie die nodig is voor de kolonisatie van Mars? En willen ze Elon Musk verleiden tot samenwerking met Turkije? En wil Turkije daarmee twee vliegen in één klap slaan door daarmee tevens het toerisme in Turkije een nieuwe impuls te geven?
   
By Cahid Atik, November 11, 2020

Colonizing the Red Planet will be real, but for now on Earth, with the project called Mars Colony prepared for the touristic destination Kusadasi of Turkey's Aydin Province.

Within the scope of the Mars Colony plan, which is considered a captivating glimpse into the future, an astronaut training school and simulator will be constructed, from where the generations Y and Z will experience the Martian surface.

Ingredients of the Mars Colony
As reported by AA, the space-themed plan submitted to the Ministry of Culture and Tourism also comprises sights on farming and surface research work on the Red Planet. In addition, a scientific theme park, 30 boutique hotels as well as food menus for astronauts to boost gastronomy tourism are in the to-do list.

Executives in the industry envisage breakthrough changes to the tourism trends for the foreseeable future, especially after the coronavirus pandemic.

A new approach in tourism
The intention is to revive economic opportunities whilst emboldening people to explore the technological possibilities.

"Our project will open the doors of a new approach in tourism," Kusadasi Mayor Omer Gunel said, adding that it would "inspire the whole world."

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, whose goal is to build a settlement in the Red Planet in the forthcoming years, is undoubtedly the first name that comes to our mind when we say Mars.

Elon Musk will see the project
Martin Halliwell, one of the project consultants, said he would introduce the Mars Colony plan to Musk with whom he worked in the past.

Construction in modular buildings is expected to be completed as soon as possible. The project, of which the tender process is currently underway, could cost about 30 Turkish liras, or $2.4-3.6 million.
Gun jezelf wat je een ander toewenst     islam = racisme   & de hel op aarde voor mens en dier
                                   koran = racistisch & handboek voor criminelen
      Moslimlanden bewijzen dagelijks:    meer islam = meer verkrachte mensenrechten
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sjun
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Lid geworden op: zo mei 11, 2014 8:29 pm
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Re: Kolonisatie van Mars noodzaak!

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Daar is helemaal geen geld voor in Turkije. Of laten ze de drukpersen nog harder draaien om voldoende lira ter betaling van deze plannen en vlucht vooruit te hebben?
Het recht op vrije meningsuiting wordt algemeen geaccepteerd, totdat iemand er daadwerkelijk gebruik van wil maken.
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Pilgrim
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Lid geworden op: wo jan 17, 2007 1:00 pm
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Re: Kolonisatie van Mars noodzaak!

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Elon Musk: First Mars City Will Start With Glass Domes

Victor Tangermann - November 19th 2020

Afbeelding

"At least a future spacefaring civilization — discovering our ruins — will be impressed humans got that far."

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has some ambitious plans to turn humanity into an multiplanetary species.

With the aid of a fleet of Starship spacecraft, the intrepid billionaire wants to establish a permanent foothold on Mars, one million people strong, by 2050.

Now, Musk is publicly fleshing out his vision further.

“Life in glass domes at first,” Musk wrote in a Thursday tweet, responding to a question about what life on Mars will look like early on. “Eventually, terraformed to support life, like Earth.”

Scientists and science fiction authors have long suggested that terraforming could allow humans to breathe on the open Martian surface. But that vision is still a distant dream — far beyond the first Martian bases, according to Musk.

“Terraforming will be too slow to be relevant in our lifetime,” Musk wrote in a follow-up tweet. “However, we can establish a human base there in our lifetime. At least a future spacefaring civilization — discovering our ruins — will be impressed humans got that far.”

Terraforming Mars is indeed a massive undertaking. An analysis last year concluded that it may require 3,500 nuclear warheads every single day to increase Mars’ atmospheric pressure to breathable levels and melt the planet’s ice caps in order to release carbon dioxide, which will then be trapped in the form of greenhouses gases.

But there’s one big snag with that plan. The ensuing radiation would also turn the surface completely inhabitable.

And a 2018 study also concluded that there simply isn’t enough trapped carbon dioxide on the Red Planet to sufficiently raise enough atmospheric pressure to sustain humans on the surface.

But those limitations aren’t going to stop Musk from going after his dream of establishing a permanent presence there.

Musk has previously claimed that with the help of “a thousand” Starship spacecraft, massive rockets he says will be capable of carrying to 100 tons of cargo or 100 passengers between planets, “a sustainable Mars city” could be established. About 100 vehicles would each have to carry 100 tons of cargo every two years, according to Musk’s calculations.

Early settlements might look a little rough around the edges.

“Getting to Mars, I think, is not the fundamental issue,” he said during a September virtual Humans to Mars summit. “The fundamental issue is building a base, building a city on Mars that is self-sustaining.”

“I want to emphasize, this is a very hard and dangerous and difficult thing,” he added at the time. “Not for the faint of heart. Good chance you’ll die. And it’s going to be tough, tough going, but it’ll be pretty glorious if it works out.”

The ambition lies very close to the entrepreneur’s heart — or at least his marketing strategy.

“If we don’t improve our pace of progress, I’m definitely going to be dead before we go to Mars,” Musk said during the Satellite 2020 conference in Washington back in March.

His space company has come a long way in turning Starship a reality. Several early prototypes have already taken to the skies, albeit only to a height of roughly 500 feet. In the following weeks, the first prototype will attempt fly to an altitude to nine miles.

If everything goes according to Musk’s ambitious plan, the first Starship will make its way to Mars as soon as 2024.

READ MORE: Terraform Mars: Elon Musk says a Mars city of ‘glass domes’ comes first [Inverse]

https://futurism.com/elon-musk-first-ma ... lass-domes
De Islam is een groot gevaar!
Jezus leeft maar Mohammed is dood (en in de hel)
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Pilgrim
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Lid geworden op: wo jan 17, 2007 1:00 pm
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Re: Kolonisatie van Mars noodzaak!

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What If You Lived In a Closed Biosphere?
29 nov. 2020

De Islam is een groot gevaar!
Jezus leeft maar Mohammed is dood (en in de hel)
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xplosive
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Lid geworden op: do jun 30, 2011 11:18 pm

Re: Kolonisatie van Mars noodzaak!

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By The Physics arXiv Blog | Published: Monday, January 11, 2021

On 18 February, the Mars2020 mission will touch down in a small crater called Jezero near the Martian equator. The mission includes a rover called Perseverance that will explore the area, analyze rocks and gather samples to be returned to Earth by a later mission due to fly in 2026. The mission also includes a helicopter drone called Ingenuity that will scout ahead, looking for intriguing targets to study.

Jezero is interesting because it was once filled with liquid water and so should contain significant evidence of its effects. Even more tantalizing is the possibility that the crater once hosted life. Indeed, part of the Mars2020 mission is to search for signs of life and any biosignatures preserved in the rock.

Planetary geologists have long studied Jezero, marking it as a potential landing site for Mars missions. But the decision to send a rover there has made it the target of much more study.

In particular, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, currently orbiting the Red Planet, has sent back numerous visible and infrared images of the region that have allowed geologists to study remotely the types of rock Perseverance is likely to encounter.

Now Adrian Brown from NASA headquarters in Washington DC says this work has helped to create a remarkably detailed picture of the rocks that Perseverance will find and how they might have been altered by the action of water. Brown also discusses the idea that the rocks in Jezero crater are similar to Earth-bound outcrops in Warrawoona, Australia, which contain the oldest fossilized evidence of life on Earth.

Afbeelding
Jezero Crater is seen in this natural-color mosaic made by combining shots from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Mars Express. The Perseverance rover's landing site (circled) is near the ancient river delta that winds from the crater's rim on the left
                                                                                                         NASA/JPL/MSSS/ESA/DLR/FU-Berlin/J. Cowart


First some background. Mars was once very different from the dry arid planet we see today. Some 4 billion years ago, Mars's many volcanoes, some of the biggest in the Solar System, began pumping huge volumes of gas and dust into the atmosphere.

This trapped energy from the Sun causing temperatures to rise and allowing liquid water to pool on the surface. The atmosphere might even have supported clouds and rainfall, creating conditions that were ripe for the emergence of life.

But about 3.7 billion years ago, the planet began to cool, along with its interior, shutting down the planet's internal magnetic dynamo and destroying its magnetic field.

As the surface cooled, the liquid water froze at the poles or became permafrost. This created the conditions for massive flooding. Whenever an asteroid impact heated an area, the permafrost melted, sending torrents across the surface. Today, the planet is scarred by the huge channels carved by these floods.

Planetary geologists think Jezero crater filled with water at least twice but that the resulting lakes were long lived, lasting perhaps 10 million years and finally disappearing about 3.7 billion years ago. "This may be the final time water flowed on Mars," says Brown, who presented this paper at the 23rd International Mars Society Convention in October.

The crater is about 50 kilometers in diameter and well-studied using the cameras aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images at various frequencies of visible and infrared light reveal the composition of the rock and also its grain size, which reveals how it has weathered over time.

Brown says this shows the crater was originally formed in rock consisting of olivine, a mineral containing iron, magnesium and silicates, as well as well carbonates. Brown says an important discovery is a rocky outcrop beyond the waterline that reveals the unaltered rock as it originally formed. This will become an essential reference for the mission, against which altered rocks can be compared.

Water works

Within the crater, clay has formed in various areas, which geologists believe can only happen in the presence of water, which will have carried the necessary minerals from surrounding areas. This is likely to have formed in layers, which may be visible near the shoreline.

The most intriguing line of investigation is Brown's comparison between the rocks in Jezero crater and those at Warrawoona in Australia. Back in 1983, paleobiologists discovered evidence of fossilized cells in these rocks, which formed some 3.5 billion years ago. They represent the oldest geological evidence of life on Earth.

That immediately raises the tantalizing possibility that similar evidence might be present in Jezero crater.
If so, an important question is whether Perseverance will be able to gather this evidence and analyze it in the necessary detail.

That's a big ask, even for a mission designed to look for signs of life. "The limitations in spaceflight-ready instrumentation and the remote location of the scientific team limit the extent of scientific analyses that can be done by rover missions to Mars," Brown points out.

But even if not, Perseverance will gather samples that will later be returned to Earth by a sample return mission. The advantage of such an approach is that the rocks can be studied in more detail by a wider variety of instruments. "Inspired by the Apollo samples, which still continue propel new lunar science discoveries, we anticipate that the analyses of the samples returned by MSR will rely on future instrumentation that may not even exist today," says Brown.

Brown says NASA and the European Space Agency have agreed to work on the sample return mission together. "The nominal launch date is planned for 2026, with a nominal return of samples by 2031," he says. So for a definitive answer to any questions about signs of life on Mars, we will probably have to wait until then.

Ref: Mars2020 and Mars Sample Return arxiv.org/abs/2012.08946
Gun jezelf wat je een ander toewenst     islam = racisme   & de hel op aarde voor mens en dier
                                   koran = racistisch & handboek voor criminelen
      Moslimlanden bewijzen dagelijks:    meer islam = meer verkrachte mensenrechten
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xplosive
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Lid geworden op: do jun 30, 2011 11:18 pm

Re: Kolonisatie van Mars noodzaak!

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By Brad Bergan, January 08, 2021

Despite appearances, Elon Musk is not the first person to set his eyes on building a settlement on Mars.

Decades ago, the renowned astrophysicist Carl Sagan emphasized the need for humans to become a multi-planet species before the "shooting range" of asteroids in our solar system struck Earth again.

Sagan has since passed away, but popular theoretical physicist and futurist Professor Michio Kaku of CUNY says the interplanetary baton is now in the hands of Elon Musk — the outspoken CEO of SpaceX — to revive Sagan's dream of a spacefaring civilization, according to a recent YouTube video interview with Big Think.

Sagan died in 1996, but his vision for humans to expand beyond the Earth has only grown more compelling as increased global threats like climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic, and more reveal the fragile state of single-planet existence.

Earth has experienced at least five major extinction periods — and if this isn't worrying enough, the "probability that the Earth will be hit by a civilization-threatening small world in the next century is a little less than one in a thousand," said Sagan, before his eventual passing. "The probability of dying on a random commercial airline flight is one-in-two million."

Elon Musk warns about Earth's 'big rock' problem

Enter Professor Kaku — who thinks Elon Musk can bring Sagan's dream to fruition in a more realistic and creative way. In the video, Kaku notes how Musk's present-day efforts are more appropriate to the global threats humanity faces now than they were in 1996.

For example, in 2019, Musk tweeted "a big rock will hit Earth eventually," and emphasized the significance that Earth has zero defense mechanisms to save planet-bound humans.

Multitude of rocket types could take us to Mars

"As an insurance policy, we have to make sure that humans become a two-planet species," said Kaku, in the Big Think video. "These are the words of Carl Sagan."

"And now, of course, Elon Musk has revived this vision by talking about a multi-planet species," added Kaku in the video. "He wants to put up to a million colonists [on Mars, sent] by his rockets financed by a combination of public and private funding, including fusion rockets, ramjet fusion rockets, including anti-matter rockets."

Self-replicating robots could build human cities on Mars

However, Kaku doesn't ignore the colossal challenges humanity will face on the path to settling Mars. One major obstruction is the giant bill a trip to Mars incurs. Even as the richest man on Earth (which Musk is), a trip to Mars is a serious financial enterprise to pursue.

To soften the financial blow, Kaku thinks the more efficient path lies in sending robots to the Red Planet — where they can build local habitats for future astronauts.

"With one self-replicating robot, you get two, then four, then eight, 16, 32, 64, until you have an army of these robots that can build cities on Mars," explained Kaku in the Big Think video. "That's why I say given the fact that Mother Nature and the laws of physics have a death warrant for humanity that ultimately our destiny will be in outer space."

Elon Musk's aims for Mars may save human species

Nearly a year into a global pandemic, at the cusp of a major climate catastrophe, it's easy to fall into mild despair — and accept the status quo as a "new normal."

But according to Professor Kaku, Elon Musk's redux of Carl Sagan's push for humanity to become an interplanetary species is more urgent now because it offers hope of a brighter future — if not for everyone, then at least for the species.
Gun jezelf wat je een ander toewenst     islam = racisme   & de hel op aarde voor mens en dier
                                   koran = racistisch & handboek voor criminelen
      Moslimlanden bewijzen dagelijks:    meer islam = meer verkrachte mensenrechten
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